Monthly Archives: August 2011

US Intelligence Officer’s Torture Suit against Rumsfield in his Personal Capacity Allowed to Proceed

No Comments
August 5  |  Headlines  |   david

The US District Court for the District of Columbia ruled against Rumsfield on a motion to dismiss. The US citizen, formerly employed as an intelligence officer by a US Defense Department contractor, claims he was abducted and tortured while imprisoned in Iraq without charges having been formerly brought concerning allegations he passed information to the enemy. The Justice Department is defending Rumsfeld. This is the second time Rumsfield has been allowed to be sued personally in a torture case. http://bit.ly/o4Xv5j

Does Debt Ceiling Crisis Point Out Weakness in American Constitutional Law Jurisprudence?

No Comments
August 1  |  Headlines  |   david

In an opinion piece Cornell law professor Michael Dorf argues that failure of the President to pay sums due might violate Section 4 of the Fourteenth Amendment as it would call into question “the validity of the public debt of the United States,” but Article I, Section 8, Clause 2 provides that it is the Congress which has the power “to borrow Money on the credit of the United States.” 

Let’s hope the members of Congress who have seemed more interested in partisan rancor than in solving problems, don’t put the President in that dilemma and, for the first time in our nation’s history, force the courts to address this constitutional law issue.  http://bit.ly/pjdvLk